Center for Speech and Language Disorders

Center for Speech and Language Disorders
Therapy That Makes A Difference

820 North Orleans Street Suite 217
Chicago, IL 60610

630-652-0200 310-D South Main Street
Lombard, IL 60148

Helping Individuals Reach Their Full Potential

Listening & Understanding Milestones

 

Birth–3 Months

  • Startles to loud sounds
  • Quiets or smiles when spoken to
  • Seems to recognize your voice and quiets if crying
  • Increases or decreases sucking behavior in response to sound

4–6 Months

  • Moves eyes in direction of sounds
  • Responds to changes in tone of your voice
  • Notices toys that make sounds
  • Pays attention to music

7 Months–1 Year

  • Enjoys games like peek-a-boo and pat-a-cake
  • Turns and looks in direction of sounds
  • Listens when spoken to
  • Recognizes words for common items like "cup", "shoe", "book", or "juice"
  • Begins to respond to requests (e.g. "Come here" or "Want more?")

1 Year–2 Years

  • Points to a few body parts when asked.
  • Follows simple commands and understands simple questions ("Roll the ball," "Kiss the baby," "Where's your shoe?").
  • Listens to simple stories, songs, and rhymes.
  • Points to pictures in a book when named.

2 Years–3 Years

  • Understands differences in meaning ("go-stop," "in-on," "big-little," "up-down").
  • Follows two requests ("Get the book and put it on the table").
  • Listens to and enjoys hearing stories for longer periods of time

3 Years–4 Years

  • Hears you when you call from another room.
  • Hears television or radio at the same loudness level as other family members.
  • Understands words for some colors, like red, blue, and green
  • Understands words for some shapes, like circle and square
  • Understands words for family, like brother, grandmother, and aunt

4 Years–5 Years

  • Understands words for order, like first, next, and last.
  • Understands words for time, like yesterday, today, and tomorrow.
  • Follows longer directions, like "Put your pajamas on, brush your teeth, and then pick out a book."
  • Follows classroom directions, like "Draw a circle on your paper around something you eat."
  • Hears and understands most of what is said at home and in school.

(From the American Speech and Hearing Association www.ASHA.com)